Geosciences at Virginia Tech

Faculty and Instructors

Martin C. Chapman
Research Associate Professor of Geophysics

Office:
1059 Derring Hall
+1.540.231.5036 (Phone)
+1.540.231.3386 (FAX)

Mailing Address:
Department of Geosciences
4044 Derring Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24061

Education:
Ph.D., Geophysics, Virginia Tech, 1998
M.S., Geophysics, Virginia Tech, 1979
B.S., Geophysics, Virginia Tech, 1977

Homepage:


Research Interests

I work in two distinct topical areas. The first is the study of seismicity and tectonics of plate interiors. The second is strong-motion seismology. My goal is to combine results from both areas and contribute an improved scientific basis for assessment and mitigation of earthquake hazards, particularly for plate-interior areas such as eastern North America. There is a strong observational element in my work. I am director of the Virginia Tech Seismological Observatory (VTSO). I study the geologic causes of the earthquakes and the characteristics of seismic wave propagation in the region using data from VTSO stations as well as other seismic stations in eastern North America. As a strong-motion seismologist, I make extensive use of the world-wide collection of strong motion data from large earthquakes to characterize and predict damaging motions in the near-fault distance range in a variety of tectonic environments.

Professional Experience

2010-Present: Associate Research Professor, Department of Geosciences, Virginia
Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia

2000-2010: Assistant Research Professor, Department of Geosciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia

1983 - 2000: Research Associate, Department of Geological Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic
Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia

1979 - 1983: Seismologist with Law Engineering Testing Company,
Marietta, Georgia

Service to Professional Societies

Associate Editor, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America,
1995-Present

Eastern Section Pages Editor, Seismological Research Letters, 1998-Present.

Vice-President, Eastern Section, Seismological Society of America, 2009-Present.

Secretary, Eastern Section, Seismological Society of America, 2008-Present

Selected Recent Publications

Chapman, M.C. and J.N. Beale (2010). On the Geologic Structure at the Epicenter of the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina Earthquake, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, vol. 100, no. 3 1010-1030.

Chapman, M.C., and J.N. Beale (2010). Mesozoic-Cenozoic Structure at the Epicenter of the 1886, Charleston, South Carolina, Earthquake, Seismological Research Letters , vol. 81 no. 2, 360.

Chapman, M.C. and J.N. Beale (2010). The 1886 Charleston, South Carolina Earthquake: Fault Reactivation in a Mesozoic Extensional Terrane, Joint Northeastern - Southeastern Section Annual Meeting, Geological Society of America, URL www.geosociety.org/sectdiv/northe/2010mtg/.

Chapman, M.C. and J.N. Beale (2010). Results of reprocessing seismic reflection data near Summerville, South Carolina, Seismological Research Letters , vol 81 no. 1, 154.

Chapman, M.C. (2009). A Comparison of Short-Period and Broadband Seismograph Systems in the Context of the Seismology of the Eastern United States, Seismological Research Letters, 80, 936-952.

Chapman, M.C. (2009). Broadband Receiver Functions at Stations in the Southeastern United States, Seismological Research Letters, 80, no. 1, pp 166.

Chapman, M.C. and J.N. Beale (2008). Mesozoic and Cenozoic Faulting Imaged at the Epicenter of the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina Earthquake, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 98, 2533-2542.

Chapman, M.C. and S.D. King (2008). Upper Mantle Structure Beneath the Southeastern United States from Receiver Functions: Evidence for Small-Scale Mantle Convection?, Eos Trans., 89, AGU Fall Meeting, Abstract no. S43A-1878.

Chapman, M.C. and J.N. Beale, (2008). Faulting at the Epicenter of the 1886, Charleston, South Carolina Earthquake Imaged by Seismic Reflection Profiling, Eos Trans., 89, AGU Fall Meeting, Abstract no. S13-04.

Chapman, M.C. and J.N. Beale (2008). Significant faulting imaged at the epicenter of the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina Earthquake, Seismological Research Letters, 79, no. 2, 315.

Chapman, M. C. (2008). A Comparison of Co-located Short-Period and Broadband Seismograph Systems, Seismological Research Letters, 79, no. 1, 139.

Chapman, M.C., J.N. Beale and R.D. Catchings (2008). Q for P-waves in the sediments of the Virginia Coastal Plain, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 98, 2022-2032.

Chapman, M.C. and J.N. Beale (2008). P Wave Attenuation in the Virginia Coastal Plain, Seismological Research Letters, 79, no. 1, 137.

Chapman, M.C. (2007). Near-source Vertical Ground Motions at Soil Sites: S to P Conversion at the Soil-rock Interface, Seismological Research Letters, 78, no. 1, 163.

Chapman, M.C., J.R. Martin, C.G. Olgun, and J.N. Beale (2006). Site-Response models for Charleston, South Carolina, and vicinity developed from shallow geotechnical investigations, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America 96, 467-489.

Chapman, M.C. (2006). Simultaneous Vertical and Horizontal Strong Motion: Soil Sites and Reverse Faults, Seismological Research Letters, 77, no.2, 320.

Dunn, M. M. and M.C. Chapman (2006). Fault Orientation in the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone: A Study Using the Double-Difference Earthquake Location Algorithm, Seismological Research Letters, 77, no. 4, 494-504.

Kim, W-Y and M.C. Chapman (2005). The 9 December 2003, Central Virginia, Earthquake Sequence: A Compound Earthquake in the Central Virginia Seismic Zone, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 95, 2428-2445.

Lester, A. P. and M. C. Chapman (2005). An Examination of Site Response in Columbia, South Carolina, Seismological Research Letters, 76, no.1, 118.

Dunn, M. and M. Chapman (2005). Relocation of Eastern Tennessee Earthquakes Using HypoDD, Seismological Research Letters, 76, no. 1, 115

Chapman, M. C., (2005). The Seismicity of Central Virginia, Seismological Research Letters, 76, no.1, 115.

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